Instagram Musings: Riverside Park South

Some shots of the beautiful Riverside Park South. For decades, Manhattan's Riverside park ended at 72nd Street, leaving room for what had been the New York Central's 60th Street freight yard & car float facility. Here, freight was transferred to or from barges across the Hudson, and was either sent north or (far more likely) south, along the Highline. Indeed, the "West Side Improvement," one of Robert Moses's early, not-actually-evil projects, built Riverside Park and the Henry Hudson Parkway as we know them today in large part to bury the northbound New York Central tracks. At 72nd street, the parkway soared up onto a viaduct, and continued down along the west side of Manhattan as the Miller Elevated Highway, known as the West Side Highway, until most of it was demolished in mid-1970s. Beginning in 1998, and continuing through the present, the park has been extended southwards, partly as part of the Riverside South real estate development (partly by he-who-shall-not-be-named). This also worked to connect the park to the Hudson River Greenway, giving bike and pedestrian access along Manhattan's entire waterfront. For one reason or another, I never had the opportunity to explore this part of the park… so I decided to change that! It is a *wonderful* place. I admit, park design is not one of my fields of expertise—in some ways it feels like black magic. Here, there are varying landscapes of very different plants, a historically-preserved railroad heritage, and lots of both programmed areas, be they natural-looking or for activities, and open areas for recreation. The sheer transformation of the landscape every 100 feet is an amazing accomplishment. But it's the small touches you see, down to what I call the seating "podules," which have three types of seating: a bench, a lounge-chair for sunning, and swiveling high-chairs with a bar for eating. Wonderful touches! First part of my (short) #RiversideParkSouthWalk. A little more below:

A post shared by Blair Lorenzo (@foxandcity) on

Some shots of the beautiful Riverside Park South. For decades, Manhattan's Riverside park ended at 72nd Street, leaving room for what had been the New York Central's 60th Street freight yard & car float facility. Here, freight was transferred to or from barges across the Hudson, and was either sent north or (far more likely) south, along the Highline. Indeed, the "West Side Improvement," one of Robert Moses's early, not-actually-evil projects, built Riverside Park and the Henry Hudson Parkway as we know them today in large part to bury the northbound New York Central tracks. At 72nd street, the parkway soared up onto a viaduct, and continued down along the west side of Manhattan as the Miller Elevated Highway, known as the West Side Highway, until most of it was demolished in mid-1970s. Beginning in 1998, and continuing through the present, the park has been extended southwards, partly as part of the Riverside South real estate development (partly by he-who-shall-not-be-named). This also worked to connect the park to the Hudson River Greenway, giving bike and pedestrian access along Manhattan's entire waterfront. For one reason or another, I never had the opportunity to explore this part of the park… so I decided to change that! It is a *wonderful* place. I admit, park design is not one of my fields of expertise—in some ways it feels like black magic. Here, there are varying landscapes of very different plants, a historically-preserved railroad heritage, and lots of both programmed areas, be they natural-looking or for activities, and open areas for recreation. The sheer transformation of the landscape every 100 feet is an amazing accomplishment. But it's the small touches you see, down to what I call the seating "podules," which have three types of seating: a bench, a lounge-chair for sunning, and swiveling high-chairs with a bar for eating. Wonderful touches! First part of my (short) #RiversideParkSouthWalk. A little more below:

A post shared by Blair Lorenzo (@foxandcity) on

Some shots of the beautiful Riverside Park South. For decades, Manhattan's Riverside park ended at 72nd Street, leaving room for what had been the New York Central's 60th Street freight yard & car float facility. Here, freight was transferred to or from barges across the Hudson, and was either sent north or (far more likely) south, along the Highline. Indeed, the "West Side Improvement," one of Robert Moses's early, not-actually-evil projects, built Riverside Park and the Henry Hudson Parkway as we know them today in large part to bury the northbound New York Central tracks. At 72nd street, the parkway soared up onto a viaduct, and continued down along the west side of Manhattan as the Miller Elevated Highway, known as the West Side Highway, until most of it was demolished in mid-1970s. Beginning in 1998, and continuing through the present, the park has been extended southwards, partly as part of the Riverside South real estate development (partly by he-who-shall-not-be-named). This also worked to connect the park to the Hudson River Greenway, giving bike and pedestrian access along Manhattan's entire waterfront. For one reason or another, I never had the opportunity to explore this part of the park… so I decided to change that! It is a *wonderful* place. I admit, park design is not one of my fields of expertise—in some ways it feels like black magic. Here, there are varying landscapes of very different plants, a historically-preserved railroad heritage, and lots of both programmed areas, be they natural-looking or for activities, and open areas for recreation. The sheer transformation of the landscape every 100 feet is an amazing accomplishment. But it's the small touches you see, down to what I call the seating "podules," which have three types of seating: a bench, a lounge-chair for sunning, and swiveling high-chairs with a bar for eating. Wonderful touches! First part of my (short) #RiversideParkSouthWalk. A little more below:

A post shared by Blair Lorenzo (@foxandcity) on

Some shots of the beautiful Riverside Park South. For decades, Manhattan's Riverside park ended at 72nd Street, leaving room for what had been the New York Central's 60th Street freight yard & car float facility. Here, freight was transferred to or from barges across the Hudson, and was either sent north or (far more likely) south, along the Highline. Indeed, the "West Side Improvement," one of Robert Moses's early, not-actually-evil projects, built Riverside Park and the Henry Hudson Parkway as we know them today in large part to bury the northbound New York Central tracks. At 72nd street, the parkway soared up onto a viaduct, and continued down along the west side of Manhattan as the Miller Elevated Highway, known as the West Side Highway, until most of it was demolished in mid-1970s. Beginning in 1998, and continuing through the present, the park has been extended southwards, partly as part of the Riverside South real estate development (partly by he-who-shall-not-be-named). This also worked to connect the park to the Hudson River Greenway, giving bike and pedestrian access along Manhattan's entire waterfront. For one reason or another, I never had the opportunity to explore this part of the park… so I decided to change that! It is a *wonderful* place. I admit, park design is not one of my fields of expertise—in some ways it feels like black magic. Here, there are varying landscapes of very different plants, a historically-preserved railroad heritage, and lots of both programmed areas, be they natural-looking or for activities, and open areas for recreation. The sheer transformation of the landscape every 100 feet is an amazing accomplishment. But it's the small touches you see, down to what I call the seating "podules," which have three types of seating: a bench, a lounge-chair for sunning, and swiveling high-chairs with a bar for eating. Wonderful touches! First part of my (short) #RiversideParkSouthWalk. A little more below:

A post shared by Blair Lorenzo (@foxandcity) on